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Discussion
May 8, 2015

Ayiti: The Cost of Life, and, how to win it

by: 20karimr

In the game Ayiti: The Cost of Life, you must help a family suffering from poverty survive in Haiti, and you have five family members, and you can send them to school, work, farm, or the hospital when they get sick. On my first tow tries I sent the father to work at the Rum Distiller, and he died both times, lowering the family income. This affected me greatly because without him working and all the other ones did not have very high pay jobs, when they finally got sick I didn't have much to pay the Hospital to save them and they all died from something like Cholera (Bloody Diarrhea). The second time as soon as the father died, the mother soon followed, and I got a message saying that without guardians the children could not go on alone and were sent to live with their nearby family, who could support them. This struck me as odd because why didn't they go live with this family before or why didn't the family support them when they were all dying? However this is not the point. On my third and final try, I managed to keep one family member alive by doing exchanges between where everyone was working. First, I put 3 people at work, and 2 on the farm, then exchanged them a bit, and whenever someone got sick i let them die because i was in negative money already and i couldn't afford the hospital anyway so I dint waste extra money knowing that they would die anyway. In the end i survived with inly the mother with 0 of every statistic, and some random sickness. I won the game but I am fairly sure that this lady died three seconds after the four years were over, the rate she was going at.

Discussion
May 8, 2015

Family Restaurant

by: cisaacman

This past week on Tuesday Drama A created a scene using improvisation which is titled "Family Restaurant". During the scene the family set up for business, invited customers, served food and dealt with being the restaurant being held up.

What occurred to me watching the scene and taking pictures is that as a class creating a scene that just about everyone was involved in was that students incorporating props and costume pieces as well as using some set pieces like the classroom tables and chairs were creating a theater space and defining their making of theater as well as creating thier theater space. Also, after all of the work with text, a class needs to use props and costume pieces and set pieces, as well as make up in order to make a scene come alive.

Discussion
May 7, 2015

Ayiti: The Cost of Life

by: 20iazzagm

The game Ayiti: The Cost of Life is a computer game where a family of five lives throughout four years. It is the player's job to take care of the family by putting them to work, buying them their needs, and getting them an education so that they can live throughout all four years. Obstacles the characters may go through are losing money, getting sick, and all of the characters dying off. I'll tell you how I did.

I played the game a total of four times.

The first time I played, I managed to kill off the entire family in the first part of the year(whoo hoo me, right?). I made them work too much and didn't know how to play. I was buying things uncontrollably, because my money wasn't going down. Then I realized that when I clicked "start season, THAT was when the money I used to pay for the things I bought actually got paid. I ended up having negative amounts of money. Did I mention I killed off the whole family by accident?

The second time I played, the family lived for one season longer than before. Then they died of a cold. All of them. I also forgot to take them to school to get educated and have a good job, so the family was broke.

The third time I played, I was doing better, and made it through two full years. Then the family started getting sick of chlorela and a cold. Of the five family members, the mother and the daughter were left. Then the daughter and the mom had vitamin deficiency, but I couldn't go to the doctor, because I had lost all my money. They ended up dying, and that was when I lost the game.

By the fourth time I played, I just gave up and decided to cheat. I had to look up "how to win the game Ayiti: The Cost of Life". Then I learned tricks to playing the game, and was playing the last season of the fourth year. I thought I was going to win. Then the father AND the mother got sick and died. The children couldn't be left alone, so I lost the game.

The game was a really educational one. It showed how hard it was to give a family its basic needs, let alone having them go to school and then getting a diploma. It shows how hard people work to stay alive and try to live life to the fullest. That, I feel (despite all my epic fails) is really the point of the game. It's to show people how hard some others work to have the best lives possible.

*To anyone who wants to play the game, here's the link to it

https://ayiti.globalkids.org/game/

Discussion
May 6, 2015

Strategies for Ayiti: The Cost of Life

Ayiti: The Cost of Life

I found this game mildly interesting. My first time playing, on purpose, I experimented with the game and tried to test what each character could do. All the characters died by the Hurricane Season.
My second time playing, I wanted to get them to work, so I sent the parents to work and the children to work at the farm. I lost so much money so quickly, they all died before the end of the second year.
My third time playing, I sent the parents as volunteers and let the children stay at home. The children died after the first year, but surprisingly, the parents seemed to stay alive. I let them rest from Years 2-4, and for some reason I won. This isn't a perfect strategy, but somehow, I won.

Discussion
May 6, 2015

Playing Ayiti

by: 20mancham

"Ayiti; The Cost of Life" is a very good game. This game is about a family of 5 attempting to survive in Haiti. The family is dwelling in poverty and it is now up to the players to make sure that they survive the poverty and, in the process, go on to become great people with a better future than they had in their children, within the game. There are 5 sprites within the game that the player has control over; Jean, Marie, Patrick, Jacquline, and Yves. The rules of the game are simple, yet very hard to surpass; the parents must survive, the family must be happy, and the family must have money. The game takes over a span of 4 years and 16 seasons (4 seasons per year), within the family's perspective/perception of duration. The games objective is to make strategies for the family to survive the 4 years, with enough health, money, and happiness.
When I first played, "Ayiti; The Cost of Life", the game was immediately over. The directions and some of the features of the game were not clearly stated. Sometimes the purpose behind the actions and decisions were not clearly explained. Some examples were the shopping features, the shopping items in sale, and the volunteer work. Due to the fact that it was not clearly stated and/or their purpose explained, I had to be taught the hard way, through trial and error. Such constant trial and error decisions the family's inevitable imminent demise. However, this prepared me for the next time that I would be perfect at it.
When I played, for a second time, "Ayiti; The Cost of Life", I won. The main principle that I utilized to win was that I maintained balance. There was a balance point between all the options. I maintained a balance between money, health, happiness, and education. This game is very daring. One has to be very daring when playing this game. Sometimes maintaining the balance was very scary and it was tempting to break the balance. I had to be very strict, evening when most of my characters were dying. One has to be courageous and not be afraid to change their original strategy. I did not have any sympathy for the characters. Yes, sometimes the characters had to dwell in terrible living conditions, yet it was for the best and for their inevitable survival. Even though it may seem tempting and the right thing to do, do not give up!
I really liked this game. Hence, I came back to play another time. This time I wanted to switch up the and focus more on the money. I focused on making more profits than focusing/investing on the family' happiness and education. The end result was even better. I saw that the money was central to the family's survival. With money, you can make the education, health, and happiness that the family requires/mandates, within the sanctuary of this game. Although this was cruel to the family, as short-term effects, however, as the long-term effects, it brought/bestowed more festivity/prosperity amongst the family. Playing with this strategy had it flaws and playing with this strategy also had its advantages. However, in the end, in the aftermath, in the long-term effect, this strategy pre-dominates the others.

Discussion
May 5, 2015

Ayiti: The Cost of Life

by: 20ahmedr

As of now, I have played Ayiti: The Cost of Life 3 times. Granted, it was quite difficult. I underestimated the difficulty of the game, as it seemed similar to another one I had played, which seemed fairly easy. Instead, this game was much more brutal.

In my first game, I managed to make all my characters live until the Hurricane Season in Year 2, after which they started dying. Becoming broke, I couldn't treat them, so it was a defeat no matter what happened. My basic strategy was to send the parents to get an education for the first season, then have the kids work and the smallest one volunteer. It worked out great for the first season. After getting a lot of money in the first season, I sent the parents to work, which also worked out well for the most part. This season, I let the girl stay and the other two work at the farm, also earning good money. However, halfway through the season the older boy got sick and I sent him home. Despite that, I managed to pull through, and set it up in the same way again. This wielded to be a good process, as barely anyone got sick. However, once I got to the second Hurricane Season, things got a bit more brutal, and thus the characters got sick. By the end of the 2nd year, everyone was dead.

In the second session of the game, I did mostly the same thing. This time, however, I sent the mother for an education and the rest to work or volunteer. This wielded less money, but was ok nonetheless. Going on to the next season, I sent the parents to work and the children at the farm. Again, less money, but this time no one got sick. The third season was the same set up as the previous season, and the same would go for the fourth season. The second year went the same way, except that the father was educated instead of the mother. Now, money became a slightly crucial thing for me, but I couldn't push things. During the Hurricane Season, the money was alarmingly low, so I forced everyone working to work harder, which resulted in them all getting sick, and dying out by the end of the year.

Finally, in the last run of the game, I sent the parents and the smallest child for an education, which was quite taxing on my money. Thus, I forced the other kids to work hard, and luckily none of them got sick. Hurricane Season went somewhat better, seeing as how I produced more money and no one got sick. Going into the third season, however, a few characters got sick, and couldn't work, so the money came in a bit slow. Due to unfortunate events, the whole family got sick, and died out by the third season in the second year.

Overall, I thought it was a challenging game. It's very helpful to the mind when it comes to creating strategies for almost anything, and it is a good time consumer. However, there are a few flaws I saw, as I saw things that seemed slightly unimportant, but that could just be me. Other than that, it was a great game.

Discussion
May 5, 2015

Ayiti:The Cost of Life

by: 20choir
game
choices
story
directions

Recently I played this game called, "Ayiti: The Cost of Life." It really IS the cost of life. If the parents in this game die, everyone dies. I will tell you the experiences throughout playing this game.

I didn't know how to play, so I thought I could win by putting in my fake age as 12 to 5 years old. I tried the game out, but it was really hard....LIKE REALLY HARD. It was really confusing how there were so many pop-ups on the screen and the music was weird. The characters' expressions scared me and the range of various occupations was; VERY LITTLE.

I tried for the second time. This time, I didn't put in the age and I actually READ the directions. After like 5 seconds into the game, I lost like 500 money things out of nowhere. The health and happiness was going down. I only got up to year 2 and all the kids dies before the parents anyways.

I ALMOST got it on the third try...not really. I decided to buy the toys and fun stuff from the beginning. They were happy and i happy too, but apparently, the money thingy went down by 635 after pressing the next season arrow. A pop-up randomly said, "oh your cousin sent you money but it has no use cause you can't afford anything." REALLY?!

Yeha...I don't like games anyways I HATE THEM ever since the beginning. This game had too much control things going on in the screen and confused me. There were too many members of the family, there were barely any useful occupations, the music was creepy, the family died too quickly, so I HAPPILY LOST EVERY GAME.

Discussion
May 5, 2015

Ayiti: The cost of life

by: 20smitho
The results of my last game.

The results of my last game.

I played the game Ayiti: the cost of life four times, and each time I have learned something about life in a poor community.

The first two times I played, I tried to give the kids the best life possible by sending them to school, and sending anyone who got sick to the hospital. In both games, I ran out of money very quickly, and the family got ill very quickly. They all died in the third year both times.

The third game, I tried a different strategy. I only sent two of the kids to school, and one to work whenever he could. The characters got sick very quickly, but I had barely enough money to send them to the hospital. However, at the end of year 2, everything went downhill. The characters all got sick from horrible (and very real) diseases, and only the father survived in the end.

The final game I only played because I wanted to get the family through the year. I sent everyone to work whenever they could, and sent one kid to school. The family got very wealthy towards the end, but everyone worked hard and, mostly, the kids didn't get to go to school. Many of them got sick while working, but there was enough money to send them to the hospital.

Overall, the outcome of dying or 'barely scraping by' are equally depressing, at least to me (It took an hour and a half of M*A*S*H reruns to cheer me up after the family died from cholera twice). I learned that, in conditions like those, families all need to work hard and get money to even survive.

Discussion
May 5, 2015

Ayiti - The Cost of Life

Haiti

Recently I played a game called "Ayiti - The Cost of Life," (ayiti.globalkids.org) where you control a family of 5 in Haiti and try to help them survive everyday life. It incorporated troubles that Haitians face on a daily basis. It was surprisingly difficult, and I was surprised by the fact that I enjoyed it and learned something new. Here is how I went about trying to beat the game during each of my 3 tries.

The first time I tried to play went poorly. I was learning about the game as I went, and I learned from my mistakes only when it was already too late. I didn't read all the blurbs, and my family made a small income. Then most of my family got sick, and I tried to pay a lot of money for the hospital. I went into debt, and couldn't buy food. Because I had no food, everyone got sick. And since I couldn't pay for medication, everyone died.

The second time went better. In fact, everyone lived and I won, as I was learning more and I actually made some major changes to my strategy. First of all, I changed my living conditions from poor to decent. While this cost more money, it lowered the chances of sickness, and it wasn't overly expensive. I also tried to send people to the hospital more sparingly, and near the end learned to not always make people take a rest or go to the hospital when they're sick, and that there were items with perks in the shop. I also had the luck to get a stand, which made my income enormous.

I felt fairly confident in the third game. I managed to maintain a healthy budget an manage my visits to the hospital, but the biggest game changer was that I used the items from the store. I felt like some of the perks were very good, yet inexpensive. Even despite being robbed 3 times I ended up with lots more money owing to perks such as being able to work more easily and being able to cure simple ailments.

Discussion
May 5, 2015

Ayiti - Strategies and Outcomes

by: 20LeeJ

The first time I played Ayiti, my family died within 2 years. I had chose the money option. Just earn money no matter what. I went into crippling debt for my family became so ill and depressed that they couldn't work, and had to stay home. With the huge debt I couldn't afford school, and therefore my family was forced to work on the family farm every season. They eventually died of diseases and such.

The second time I chose happiness. The issue was I couldn't raise their happiness once it went down. Eventually I was deduced into simply following my old strategy for the family had run out of money, and I couldn't afford anything. Of course then all of my family except for Jean died of sickness. Jean lived for about 2 seasons more after his family, but not for any real reason. He eventually started to refuse work due to depression and then died of sickness as well.

The third time was the worst. I had chose education, and at first the strategy was working, but then illnesses started to hit and family members couldn't work, and soon enough I couldn't afford school. Surprisingly I never went into huge debt. Whenever a family member was sick I sent them to the hospital, but without that member working we couldn't afford it. I tried to then work my family once again, but soon the parents had died of illnesses I couldn't afford to cure. The children consequently followed.

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