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Discussion
Jun 22, 2016

What am I giving my sister?

I read parts of Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan. Reading about food led me to track my own food. Some things I’ve eaten are cereal, chicken, candy, fruits.

One part of the book that stood out for me is the chapter on chicken nuggets. Page 119 says “Chicken Mcnugget contain nearly twice as much fat as a regular hamburger.’’ This quote means to me that a chicken nugget from McDonald's, that I always buy for my sister is not 100% chicken. This quote make me think about the food that my sister and I eat.

I wonder if the food that I eat is really what it says it is because the ingredients say what exactly goes into making the food.

Making connections is an important reading strategy because it can help me understand what a book is about and making connections with my life and finding out information about things I don’t know.

Discussion
Jun 17, 2016

are we made out of corn?

by: tmyrick
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I read omnivore's dilemma by Michael Pollan reading about food and me to my food tracker. One of things i mostly eat is pork and i found out that everything is made out of corn and we could be made out of it. I asked myself,’’are we made out of corn?’’ This quote reminds me of watching the omnivore's video and both in the video and book say that everything we eat is made out of corn.I made this connection because if everything is made out of corn and we are what we eat, that would mean we are corn. Making connections is an important because it can help understanding the concept.

Discussion
Jun 16, 2016

Gary Soto is Brave, Smart, and Athletic

by: aruiz

Fifth grade is an odd year for Gary because in the book he says that the short nuns threw chalk at him, chased him with books cocked over their heads, squeezed him into cloak closets and on slow days asked him to pop erasers and to wipe the blackboards clean.

Gary Soto, the protagonist in Living Up The Street, has a few traits that influence his relationships with others.

One, he is brave. Two, he is smart. Three, he is athletic. These traits influence his relationships with others.

Gary Soto deceives his mother by believing when she said that he was a "short-tall devil in need of God’s blessings."

Discussion
Jun 16, 2016

Mean Kid!

by: aruiz

Now that I've made a Map from living up the street by Gary Soto, I am noticing that this book Living Up The Street is almost is like a poetry because of how he points out every single detail of his life to the book.

In the first paragraph of Living up the street by Gary Soto writes, "We were terrible kids I think.’’ By the end of the chapter BEING MEAN you can see that what he means is that on page 7 he says, "I threw a rock at two hanging from the wires,and they laughed that missed. The other kids laughed. Their mother, with a baby in her arms, came out to the back porch, laughed,and told us to behave ourselves."

Discussion
Jun 5, 2016

Archetype of Fiona from Shrek

by: eaglej19
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Today I'm piking out an archetyped character from the movie Shrek. For those of you who don't know, Shrek i9s a movie about the quest of a hero trying to save a cursed damsel stuck in a castle guarded by a dragon (very, very simplified version. The person I'm going to talk about is Fiona, the damsel cursed (spoiler alert) to turn ugly at night. She has a very common archetype, the damsel in distress who gets or shows more skills and abilities until the "damsel" is often regarded by the audience to be on the same level as the hero, if not higher. for example, when Shrek (the hero)first meets Fiona, she is supposedly a helpless woman who has been dreaming since birth about someone rescuing her. However, as the story progresses, you find out she can do some pretty extreme martial arts and she follows the stereotypical damsel in distress role less and less as the story progresses. By the end, she has the total respect of everyone around her and is as or more likable than Shrek himself.

Discussion
Jun 5, 2016

Archetype of Fiona from Shrek

by: eaglej19
Keywords
Channels

Today I'm piking out an archetyped character from the movie Shrek. For those of you who don't know, Shrek i9s a movie about the quest of a hero trying to save a cursed damsel stuck in a castle guarded by a dragon (very, very simplified version. The person I'm going to talk about is Fiona, the damsel cursed (spoiler alert) to turn ugly at night. She has a very common archetype, the damsel in distress who gets or shows more skills and abilities until the "damsel" is often regarded by the audience to be on the same level as the hero, if not higher. for example, when Shrek (the hero)first meets Fiona, she is supposedly a helpless woman who has been dreaming since birth about someone rescuing her. However, as the story progresses, you find out she can do some pretty extreme martial arts and she follows the stereotypical damsel in distress role less and less as the story progresses. By the end, she has the total respect of everyone around her and is as or more likable than Shrek himself.

Discussion
Jun 3, 2016

How can a book change my life?

I just started reading the book “the Omnivore’s Dilemma” by “Michael Pollan, and my first impression is how can this book change my life?

One question I have is how can this book make people lose weight? What I want the author to explain is how the book changes the way people think? This is important because he said the book has made people aware of how their food choices affect the environment and animals.

Another question I have is how is corn in everything we eat? The answer to this is probably that corn is hiding in ingredients in the food that we eat. I think I’ll be able to find out more by researching about things that is hiding in our food.

A third question i have is where our food comes from and how does it get to us? When I think more on this question, I begin to wonder if organic food or modified and synthetic food causes us to be sick or healthy.

I am looking forward to reading this book "The Omnivore Dilemma" because I will like to know if we eat food that is good for us can it make us resistant to diseases. I think genetics has something to do with it.

Discussion
Jun 3, 2016

The Raven in Regular English

The Raven in Regular English

This one night, I was up thinking, I was really sad
Because of
My eyes were heavy, almost slumpt, there was something that knocked
Someone knocking at my room door
“Who is that?” I said to myself, “knocking at my room door-
Only knocked and no one’s there”

Now I remember it was cold in December
And all of the burning wood ash was on my floor
I can’t wait for tomorrow,
From the books of incoming sadness, sadness for my girl Lenore
The only girl that the angels named Lenore
Dosen’t mean nothing anymore

Then the curtains started moving
It scared me with terror i’ve never felt before,
My heart was racing, And I kept saying
“Someone is trying to come in my room,
Someone is trying to get in here”

Finally I got the courage, and I finally said,
“Aye Bruh or Miss,
But I was about to go to sleep, Until you started knocking
And kept knocking on my room door, and know it was you”.
Then I finally opened the door,
And no one was there and nothing more.

I stared at the darkness, Straight trippin
Dreaming strange thoughts no one would dare to think
It stayed silent, but the silence gave no hint
And the only thing I have thought was “Lenore?”
I said whispered this to myself, and a echo said the same thing back
That was it and nothing more

Discussion
Jun 1, 2016

Is Organic Farming better?

by: tmyrick
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I’m learning more about why is our food system bad? Right now, what I’m wondering about is how is everything made out of corn? I've been reading The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan, and it seems like cows and pigs are most likely "made out of corn" because they eat it before they were killed. So to me, it would bee more like corn eating corn. Although farmers feed animals corn, this is kind of confusing to me.

When I watched a review of The Omnivore’s Dilemma video, I found out that everything is made out of corn. This video caught my attention because this is very good to know about this. My class and I are reading this book, and one of the questions I had for this book was, "Why are farmers using chemicals in our food?"

In the video, I found out that farmers are using sprays in our food to keep it to last longer. And it might not be healthy for us. Then if it’s not healthy for us, what is? Just plants?

The quote I chose here is basically saying why should we buy food from farmers instead? What if we do not live near farmers, then what? In the city, there are mostly farms in upstate New York. We have more fast food chains such as McDonald’s are almost around every corner.there are 655 McDonalds in NYC today than anything else today.

So my question is: Is organic farming better for us and the world? I haven’t done research on this yet, but I’m planning to.

Source
Chevat, Richie and Michael Pollan. Young Readers Edition: The Omnivore's Dilemma. New York: Dial Books, 2009. Preface, 2015. Print.

Discussion
May 24, 2016

Their Eyes Were Watching Zora

Zora Neale Hurston, an African-American writer and her involvement with the Harlem Renaissance around the 1930’s. Best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God, taking place in Eatonville, Florida where the main character Janie Crawford has trouble finding love and finding herself. After marrying twice, to Logan Killicks who tried to mold her into a field wife, then to Joe Starks who degrades Janie for her well being. But then finding her last love “TeaCake”, she felt she can be herself, until it takes a U-turn in the end.
Where does the different personalities that Zora creates come from? Taking stories from her life experiences, by releasing the love and passion for her lover Percival McGuire Punter who was graduate student from Columbia University and is 20 years younger than Hurston herself. According to a website source dedicated Zora Neale Hurston and her work stated that “Hurston and Punter were immersed and an intensely passionate, and mutually satisfying romance for a thrice married”.
With the relationship becoming more serious, Punter asks Zora Neale Hurston to give up her career, marry him, and leave New York. Telling her, “I wouldn’t want my wife to do anything but take care of me.” Although the thought of giving up her career was a chilling idea, Zora knew she wanted to do more than take care of a man, that was one thing she could have not done for Punter.
With the disagreement put aside, Hurston and Punter still continued to date. “Mutual jealousies erupted and escalated” Boyd states, “If Punter smiled too broadly at a girl on Seventh Avenue, Zora Fumed. If she accepted a kiss on the cheek from a male acquaintance, Punter smoldered”. Hopelessly in love with each other, an argument takes a wrong turn one night when Zora slaps him across his face, and vigorously Punter strikes back. After moments of pushing and shoving each other, they both come to a realization of the wrongs they were doing and apologize to one another.
Soon after, Huston says farewell to her beloved to begin her research in the Caribbean Islands of Jamaica and Haiti. Also on a quest to find herself, Hurston pours her heart for the passion of Punter into Their Eyes Were Watching God. Finishing it in seven weeks and publishing it the following year in 1937.
It would be obvious to compare the similarities of who plays which role in the book. But in regards of Hurston and the character Janie both resemble in finding themselves, I think the different men Janie marries can resemble the different personalities that Punter carries for himself. All in all, we all know love is every emotion you could possibly encounter. And although Hurston was willing to do a lot for him and must’ve hurt in the end, but without the heartbreak she endured, we wouldn’t have this marvelous book. Their Eyes Were Watching God.

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