Trains in America

Discussion
Mar 31, 2015
by: acorbato

I am interested in looking at how the US will adjust to climate change in the transportation sector. In particular, trains are an industry where there is a lot of research from other countries, but the US lacks of a lot of infrastructure. For this reason, it is a great research topic and area for the US to look into building a new passenger transportation system. They can build on the work of the Europeans and Asians to find more energy efficient methods of transporting people.

Today, I learned that the US is struggling to fund AMTRAK, the organization tasked with running passenger rail transportation. In order for the US to address the problems of aging infrastructure and develop new technology Congress will have to fund AMTRAK and other organizations to improve US rail transportation. In some ways this may be a blessing. If the rail system languishes, then there will be an opening for a complete transformation of the American rail system. Magnetic elevated rails could be introduced bringing in high speed trains capable of competing with air travel. Anyways, that will require further research.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/30/opinion/keep-the-trains-running.html

Comments

Interesting Topic

Submitted by hrodgers on Mon, 2015-04-13 00:07.

I am looking forward to seeing more research on your topic, and to see how underdeveloped our American rail systems really are. This is a great topic choice and I think it shows much more promise than your previous topic. I think it would be particularly interesting to examine hi-speed rails in China and Europe, as they hold some of the world's fastest ground transport systems, and are on the forefront of the technology. Trains are but a part of the American infrastructure system, and are one aspect of many different underdeveloped and poorly maintained infrastructures here, the other largely being bridges. Im sure you could find some type of relationship between trains and bridges, and these two important parts of our infrastructure could be interesting to look at.