Ethos, Pathos, and Logos

Guide
Feb 6, 2013

In <Author’s First and Last Name>’s <opinion piece, op-ed, editorial, news analyais, essay...>, <a href=“http://Paste.URL.here.com” target=“_blank”> "Complete Title," from <The New York Times, Austin News, or another publication...> (Month Day, Year)</a>, the author <is trying to tell us that.../seems to be making the argument that.../explains how.../explains that.../explains why.../talks about why... and how.../summarizes the idea that.../is trying to get the point across that.../discusses how.../states that...> <In two or three sentences, summarize in your own words exactly what the author says is happening and why this is either a problem or something to celebrate.>

<Author’s Last Name> uses ethos to support <his/her> claim in paragraph <specific number> when <he/she> states, "<Transcribe a sentence or two from the article your are analyzing.>" <This sentence establishes/These sentences establish> <his/her> credibility <as/because/in that...> <she/he> <shows/explains/suggests...> that <In one or two sentences specifically explain how this author’s experience or position makes him or her a reliable source for this information.>

<Author’s Last Name> uses pathos in paragraph <specific number> when <he/she> says, “<Transcribe a sentence or two from the article you are analyzing.>” This is basically saying <In one or two sentences, re-state the quotation in your own words.> This uses pathos <for it seems.../because.../in that.../as...> most readers would feel <adjective expressing a strong emotion>, thinking about <Summarize what the author describes that would probably bring out this feeling in a reader.> This makes readers  <adjective to describe a feeling>. and it might make them want to <Describe a response most readers would have.>

<Author’s Last Name> uses logos to support <his/her> claim in paragraph <specific number> when she says, "<Transcribe a sentence or two from the article you are analyzing.>" This is basically saying that <In one or two sentences, re-state the quotation in your own words.>  <Add a sentence or two more saying exactly what these facts are intended to make the reader understand.>

Most readers would <completely/mostly/only half/partially> <agree/disagree> with <Author>'s point of view.  If you’ve ever <Describe an experience or position -- an ethos reason -- that would make most people agree or disagree with the author.> The fact that the author addresses <Re-state the author’s experience that provides his or her ethos reason.> This helped show <Explain exactly why this experience demonstarates what it does to most readers.>

<Author’s Last Name> is convincing when <he/she> says that <Re-state the author’s main claim in his/her article.> However, <his/her> argument would have been stronger if <he/she> had <Describe what else the author might have included -- either logos-facts or pathos-emotional appeal -- that seem to be missing.> Overall, <Author’s First and Last Name> argument is <mostly, barely, completely, not at all> effective.