Interviews for Documentaries

Missions
Jan 18, 2016
Image for issue at Youth Voices

Will you: 

Conduct a series of interviews, starting with a classmate, moving on to Vox Pop interviews in the hallway and street, and including interviews with experts. Publish these relatively raw, unedited "dalies" on Youth Voices, and learn how to edit these interviews to include them in a documentary you are making.

Interview One of Five: Interview a Classmate

1a. Point the webcam on your computer toward a partner (with you off-camera, but close to the computer's microphone) and ask, "Who is the most important person in your life?"

1b. Continue talking with your partner for about three minutes.

1c. Learn more about "Active Listening" by annotating this article, and use these techniques in your interview.

1d. Ask good follow-up questions, like: "Can you tell me more about..." or "What did that look like?" or "Can you tell me a story to show what you mean?"

1e. Save your video as an MPEG-4 (.mp4), giving it the title: "<Your Name> Interviews <Partner's Name>," then upload it to your Google Drive.

1f. Once it finishes uploading and processing, make your video public and copy the embed code from the Pop-up window. See this How To for details on saving and uploading your video, as well as making it public and getting the embed code for 1g.

1g. Write and post a discussion on Youth Voices, using the guide, "Quoting a ... conversation..." and add the embed code from Step 1f. under your writing. (You can do this reflective writing while you are waiting for your video to finish uploading and processing.)

1h. Write two comments on other students' posts that include a video with a partner. You can find these in the left column. Use a General Discussion Response or Agree/Disagree to write to each of these students.


Interview Two of Five: Interview an Expert

2a. Scroll inside of this box to learn more about doing an Expert Interview. Read and annotate this guide for Interviewing "Experts" from Green River Community College.

2b. Write about an issue that is important to you and in your community.

2c. Read your freewriting to two or three other students and get them to tell you what parts are the most interesting or powerful.

2d. Do some research. Find two or three recent articles on the issue from reputable sources that present different perspectives, and annotate these articles with hypothes.is. Use one of these missions: Getting started with Youth Voices | How I got there | Wikipedia: A good starting point | AND MORE Connected Research Missions.

2e. Revise your freewriting from 2b, by following this guide: Personal Inquiry.

2f. Proofread and correct your revised piece of writing, then post it on Youth Voices as a discussion.

2g. Make a list of 10 - 20 questions that you might want to ask an expert about your topic. Some of these may be revised from the Self/World questions in 2b. Record your interview.

2h. Edit (See "Workflow" below.) and embed your Expert interview on the post you created in 2f.

  • Record and save your video as an MPEG-4 (.mp4), giving it the title: "<Your Name> Interviews <Expert's Name, Title>," then upload it to your Google Drive.
  • Once it finishes uploading and processing, make your video public and copy the embed code from the Pop-up window. See this How To for details on saving and uploading your video, as well as making it public and getting the embed code to add to the post from 2f.

2i. Write two comments on other students' posts that include a video with an expert. You can find these in the left column. Use a General Discussion Response or Agree/Disagree to write to each of these students.


Interview Three of Five: Interview a Person in the Hallway or Street (Vox Pop)

3a. Scroll inside of this box to learn more about doing a Vox Pop interview. Read and annotate this Radio Rookies guide using hypothes.is.

3b. Make a list of 10-20 questions that you will use in your interviews. Read your questions to other students and ask your teacher(s) for feedback. Put your questions in the order that you will be using once in the street or hallway. As you revise and re-order your quetions, keep in mind what Radio Rookies says is the most important thing to remember: "An interview is really a CONVERSATION between two people."

3c. Once your questions are ready, review these "tips and tricks for getting a good interview" from Radio Rookies:

  • Be open to possibilities, but prepare questions before you begin.
  • Stay in control of the situation.
  • Introduce yourself and get the interviewee’s name, age (and contact info, if you can).
  • Don’t be afraid to ask someone to repeat something.
  • Ask open-ended questions. Avoid Yes-or-No questions -- they lead to boring answers.
  • Ask for explanations/ follow-up questions.
  • Don’t talk over your interviewee. Let them finish completely before you jump in with the next question. Don't be afraid of silence.
  • Try to ask a question several different ways if you’re not getting a good answer.
  • At the end of an interview always ask: "Is there anything I haven’t asked you that you’d like to say?" "Do you have any questions for me?"

3d. Do your interviews, then write and post a discussion on Youth Voices, using the guide, "Quoting a ... conversation..." Capture your experiences of doing Vox Pop interviews immediately after you do them or as soon as possible. (You can do this reflective writing while you are waiting for your video to finish uploading and processing, described below.)

3e. Edit (See "Workflow" below.) and embed your Vox Pop interviews on the post you created in 3d.

  • Record and save your video as an MPEG-4 (.mp4), giving it the title: "<Your Name> Interviews <Names of People>, (Vox Pop)" then upload it to your Google Drive.
  • Once it finishes uploading and processing, make your video public and copy the embed code from the Pop-up window. See this How To for details on saving and uploading your video, as well as making it public and getting the embed code to add to the post from 2f.

3f. Write two comments on other students' posts that include a Vox Pop interview. You can find these in the left column. Use a General Discussion Response or Agree/Disagree to write to each of these students.


Interview Four of Five: Interview another Expert

4a. Scroll inside of this box to learn more about doing an Expert Interview. Read and annotate this guide for How to Interview an Expert Without Looking Like an Idiot" from the iACQUIRE blog.

4b. Write more about the issue you have been researching. Why is important to you and in your community?

4c. Read your freewriting to two or three other students and get them to tell you what parts are the most interesting or powerful.

4d. Do more research. Find two or three more articles on the issue from reputable sources that present different perspectives, and annotate these articles with hypothes.is. Use one of these missions: Use Wikipedia to Find Sources for Research | Search for News on Your Question | Use Google to Find PDFs for Research | AND MORE Connected Research Missions.

4e. Revise your freewriting from 4b, by following one of these guides: Five Reliable sources or Why People Should Care about My Research Project.

4f. Proofread and correct your revised piece of writing, then post it on Youth Voices as a discussion.

4g. Make a list of 10 - 20 questions that you might want to ask an expert about your topic. Some of these may come from questions you used for Interview Two. Record your interview.

4h. Edit (See "Workflow" below.) and embed your Expert interview on the post you created in 4f.

  • Record and save your video as an MPEG-4 (.mp4), giving it the title: "<Your Name> Interviews <Expert's Name, Title>," then upload it to your Google Drive.
  • Once it finishes uploading and processing, make your video public and copy the embed code from the Pop-up window. See this How To for details on saving and uploading your video, as well as making it public and getting the embed code to add to the post from 4f.

4i. Write two comments on other students' posts that include a video with an expert. You can find these in the left column. Use a General Discussion Response or Agree/Disagree to write to each of these students.


Final Video: Mini-documentary and Treatment

5a. Edit all of your video interviews into one final video that follows this outline: Video Treatment and Template. Notice you are asked to add quotations from your research. Post your treatment and your final video on Youth Voices.

5b. Edit (See "Workflow" below.) and embed your mini-documentary on a post you created with your written treatment.

  • Record and save your video as an MPEG-4 (.mp4), giving it a title that makes an argument about your topic/issue/question, then upload it to your Google Drive.
  • Once it finishes uploading and processing, make your video public and copy the embed code from the Pop-up window. See this How To for details on saving and uploading your video, as well as making it public and getting the embed code to add to the post from 4f.

5c. Write two comments on other students' posts that include a final mini-docuentary. You can find these in the left column. Use a General Discussion Response or Agree/Disagree to write to each of these students.


Movie Maker Workflow


Import media onto computer desktop from camera or thumb drive:
1. Plug in the device. Make sure the camera is in play mode by pressing the triangle play button.
2. Go to the windows menu and select “devices and printers”
3. Find the device and select
4. Go to the tap “Browse files” at the top of the window and select
5. Double click on icon for device and the files will open up
6. Change view to “medium images” to better see the video clips
7. Search files for video clip
8. Drag video clip onto the desktop
Importing and Editing with Movie Maker:
1. Open Movie Maker from the windows menu
2. From the menu on the upper left part of the window select “import”
3. Find the desktop and your video clips, select and press “import”. Alternatively you can drag the video clips into Movie Maker directly from the desktop.
4. A green bar on the bottom left of the Movie Maker screen will show you the import progress. When the bar is finished you will be able to play and edit your media
Editing Video in Movie Maker:
1. Your clips will appear on a timeline in the project. To play press the space bar. To stop again press the space bar,
2. To edit a clip you will use the “splice” tool. To find the tool select the “Edit” tab at the top of the window.
3. Set the cursor or play head to the point you want to make an edit and with splice tool selected press “enter”. When you do this a cut is made on the clip dividing it into two clips. You can then delete the part of the clip you want to cut out by pressing “delete”
4. To rearrange the clips on the timeline select a clip and continue to hold it while dragging it to the position you want
5. To undo an action press “CTRL+Z”
6. To redo an action press “CRTL +Y”
7. For other shortcuts go to http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/windows-movie-maker-key...
Saving You Project and Video Clips:
1. To save your project in Movie Maker select “Save” from the menu on the top left of the window. Direct the file to the desktop and save with your name
2. To organize your project and video clips on the desktop create a folder by right clicking anywhere on the desktop and select “New Folder” . Title the folder with your name and drag your project and video clips into the folder
3. Upload both your project and clips to Google Drive for backup

Work you will have: 

1. 20-40 hypothes.is annotations on four articles about listening and interviewing: "Active Listening," "Interviewing 'Experts'," "Radio Rookies DIY: Educators Guide to Teaching Interviewing Skills," and "How to Interview an Expert Without Looking Like an Idiot" You should have 5-10 annotations on each of these articles.

2. At least four minimially edited videos uploaded to your Google Drive and embeded on separate Youth Voices posts: "Interview a Clasmate," "Interview an Expert 1," "Vox Pop Interviews," "Interview an Expert 2."

3. 20-40 hypothesis annotations on at least four articles about your topic: Wikipedia article, news article, a more complex article, articles with different opinions.

4. Five drafts of writing (informal or freewriting) about your topic in Google Docs, one to match each of the four interviews outlined above and the final "treatment."

5. Five revised, proofread, edited discussion posts on Youth Voices, each connected to one of the four interviews and the final mini-documentary.

6. A three or four minute, carefully edited mini-documentary that includes quotations from your research and parts of all of your interviews.

7. Five comments on other students' interviews and posts on Youth Voices, one for each kind of interview above, and for the final video.