Night - Chapter 1

Missions
May 6, 2015
Channels
Image for issue at Youth Voices

Chicago Public Library, Copyright holder: Elie Wiesel
Elie Wiesel, aged 15, 1943–1944
Released under a Creative Commons Attribution licence by e-mail.

Will you: 

Read and annotate the first chapter of Night by Elie Wiesel. Listen to and read the words at the same time. Pause frequently to annotate the text. You can also record your reading of this chapter on VoiceThread. Then write your response to the first chapter, using one or two of the five questions in this mission. Next, get engaged in a conversation about this part of Night by commenting on another student's discussion post about chapter one. Also, be sure to reply to anybody's comment on your own discussion post. In between all of that, play the Quizlet games to review your comprehension of the text. Finally, do more research on the Holocaust, and add your findings to another comment or reply on another discussion post about Chapter 1.

Also see: Night - Chapters 2 and 3 | Night - Chapter 4 | Night - Chapter 5

Step One of Six: Read and Annotate While Listening to Chapter 1 of Night.


How to annotate on the text embedded below (while listening and pausing):
  
Click the tiny < arrow in the right-hand corner, and sign in (or sign up) at hypothes.is.

    Make notes on words

  • identify keywords and say why they are important
  • guess at, then find definitions for words you don't know
  • point to words that this author uses frequently, and explain why s/he does this

    Make notes on a paragraph or more—up to a whole page

  • a section you think is particularly memorable, and explain why
  • dialogue that shows something significant about the characters
  • something that confuses you. Say what you do understand, then explain what's still not clear.

    Make notes on the writer's craft

  • choose a specific example, and identify the literary technique used.
  • select a sentence or two, and explain how these capture the main themes of this text.
  • point out a sentence that stands out to you—for whatever reason—and explain why.


Step Two of Six: Read an Important passage from Chapter One Aloud

Let's read an important section of Night - Chapter 1 aloud. Record yourself reading pages in this VoiceThread. (You will need to log in. You can register if you don't have an account, or ask your teacher.) You should practice first. Also listen to the other recordings on each page.


Step Three of Six: Use Literature Guides to answer one or two of these questions from the "Hill and Wang Teacher's Guide"


Use a Google Doc to compose, share and get comments from peers, revise, proofread, and edit an essay that follows one of the suggested guides. Then post your literary essay as a discussion on Youth Voices.


1. Describe in detail the character of Eliezer or Moishe the Beadle. What is the nature of their relationship? Although you should start by describing either Eliezer or Moishe the Beadle, be sure to include both in your writing. Use either Tracking the Characters or Character Traits and Relationships.

2. Consider Eliezer’s feelings for his family, especially his father. What about his father’s character or place in the Jewish community of Sighet commands Eliezer’s respect or admiration? Use either Character Analysis Introduction or Character Archetypes to describe the character of Eliezer's father and his place in the Jewish community. Be sure to also include Eliezer's feelings about his family and father.

3. Early in the narrative, Moishe tells Eliezer, “Man asks and God replies. But we don’t understand His replies. We cannot understand them” (p. 5). Is this a paradox? How does Eliezer react to this seemingly unfair assertion? Apply Moishe’s statement to the ongoing crisis of faith that Eliezer faces throughout the course of this chapter of Night. Use either "Tracking the Themes / Seguimiento de los Temas or Questioning and Speculating to begin talking about this theme in Night.

4. “And then, one day all foreign Jews were expelled from Sighet,” writes Wiesel, quite bluntly. “And Moishe the Beadle was a foreigner” (p. 6). Why do you suppose this shocking information is delivered so matter-of-factly? What is the point of Wiesel’s abruptness? Also, consider the manner in which Moishe is treated by the Jews of Sighet after he has escaped the Gestapo’s capture. Are the people happy to see him? Is he himself even happy to be alive? Explain why Moishe has returned to the village. Why don’t the Jewish townspeople believe the horrible news he brings back to them? Use either Character Analysis Introduction or Character Archetypes to describe the character of Moishe the Beadle and how he is treated by the Jews of Sighet after he has escaped the Gestapo’s capture. Be sure to also include your thoughts about why the townspeople are in denial.

5. Time and again, the people of Sighet doubt the advance of the German army. Why? When the Germans do arrive, and even once they have moved all the Jews into ghettos, the Jewish townspeople still seem to ignore or suppress their fear. “Most people thought that we would remain in the ghetto until the end of the war, until the arrival of the Red Army. Afterward everything would be as before” (p. 12). What might be the reasons for the townspeople’s widespread denial of the evidence facing them? Use either "Tracking the Themes / Seguimiento de los Temas or Questioning and Speculating to begin talking about this theme of denial in Night.


Step Four of Six: Play games with these flashcards.


Step Five of Six: Have conversations by posting comments and replies.

Comment on other students' "Night - Chapter 1" discussion posts (literary essays) using the Commenting Guides: Agree/Disagree Response or General Discussion Response.

Step Six of Six: Do some research about the Holocaust, making notes. Then post new comments and replies on discussions about "Night Chapter 1."

While reading and looking at the documents from each of the "Stories of the Holocaust," pause frequently and write in Docs about what you are seeing and understanding. Use either Adding a quotation... or Quoting a speech... or Dialectical Notes. Use these notes to add new comments on other students' "Night - Chapter 1" discussion posts (literary essays) using the Commenting Guide: Quoting a Source in a Comment.