Comment on a poem about a flower or vegetable

Guide
May 15, 2011
Guide types

Dear <First Name of Students>,

Thanks for this <poem, haiku, sonnet, song, lyric, limerick, acrostic, ode, sestina, spoken word poem, rap...> about <common name of the flower or vegetable>. I really like <Name one specific literary element in the poem that you like most.>. <Add another sentence, explaining what effect this has on the reader.>

I did some research into these <flowers / vegetables>, and I found that the <common name of the flower or vegetable> or <Scientific Name of the flower or vegetable> has been used in two different ways. First <Summarize one important fact that you found in your research just before adding a quote that says the same thing here.>

<Add a quotation that goes on for a couple of sentences here. (Name of Website / Book / Magazine / or Other Source, "Title of Article." Date published or retrieved. Highlight the title of the article and use the link icon to put a link to the source under the title.>

The <flower / vegetable> is also used <Explain one more fact about this flower or vegetable in your own words. Next add a quote that is about a sentence long.> "<Add that quote here, in quotation marks." (Name of Website / Book / Magazine / or Other Source, "Title of Article." Date published or retrieved. Highlight the title of the article and use the link icon to put a link to the source under the title.>

There seems to be some evidence that this <flower / vegetable> ... <Add more facts about this flower or vegetable.>. <Just before you add a third quote from your research, summarize those sentences in your own words.>. "<Add the quote here, within quotation marks.>" <If it is the same source as the first and/or second quote, just mention that source again.>

All of this inspires me to write a <poem, haiku, sonnet, song, lyric, limerick, acrostic, ode, sestina, spoken word poem, rap...> in response to your <poem, haiku, sonnet, song, lyric, limerick, acrostic, ode, sestina, spoken word poem, rap...>. <Explain anything in your poem that might be necessary for ful understanding.>

<Write your poem here.>

 


 

This guide makes clear what is expected of a research-based response to a poem about a flower, vegetable, or fruit.

First the responder must identify the common name of the plant, then he or she needs to read about that flower, vegetable, or fruit.

Once the responder learns details about the history, significance, uses or typical characteristics of the plant, these details should be shared in a comment, with quotations from the original source. These should be cited properly and linked back to the source.

Finally, this guide asks the responder to write a poem of his or her own in response to the one in the discussion post. Details from the research should also be included in this response poem.

 

Examples: