Using iTunes and NPR Podcasts for Research

Missions
Sep 6, 2015
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Will you: 

Podcasts are rich sources of information for most any research project. Search on iTunes to see what you can find, then look on NPR to find couple of podcasts there as well. Listen carefully, take dialectical notes, then add your brief transcriptions, citations, and responses from these podcasts to your discussion post.

Go on a free podcast spree on iTunes.

The following steps are given more detail at apple.com/itunes/podcasts.

1. Open iTunes. If the program isn't on your computer yet, you may need to get a teacher to help you to download it.

2. Once your're in iTunes, select iTunes Store underneath the Store subheading in the left column of the jukebox window; then select “Podcasts” from the menu bar along the top of the store.

3. Find the search box in the top, right-hand corner, and enter a keyword for your inquiry or research project.

4. After you hit Enter, go to the column Filter by media type, and choose Podcasts again. A list of Podcast Episodes shows up at the bottom.

5. Select carefully from this list, reading the summaries by choosing academic-sounding publishers and by listening for a couple of minutes by clicking the triangle at the left of each episode.

6. When you find a podcast that is relevant to your research topic, click the free button to the right of that episode, and click Copy link.

7. Paste this link, and the link from at least one other episode of a podcast onto a Google Doc. Share that document with your teacher and a few peers, and make it Public.

8. Once you've copied into a Doc a couple of URL addresses to iTunes podcasts about your inquiry question, and you've shared that document with your teacher and a few peers, listen to each of the podcasts straight through--without other distractions--and keep notes, first on paper, then online in a Dialectical Notes form.

  • Write down the time code (minutes:seconds) for where someone in the podcast says something significant so that you can transcribe this later. 
  • After you've listened to the entire podcast at least once, open up either a new Dialectical Notes form or one that you've already begun with other sources, and add transcriptions from the podcast on the left side and responses on the right side.
  • Be sure to add a citation for your podcast at the top of your form, and in the left column add the time code (minutes:seconds) for where we can find what you are transcribing on the video (instead of the page or paragraph number).
  • Share your Dialectical Notes with your teacher and a few peers, make this document Public and Publish to the web...


Create a playlist of NPR podcasts.

1. Go to the NPR Podcast Directory.

2. Find the search box in the top, right-hand corner, and enter a keyword for your inquiry or research project.

3. Sift through the stories that appear, reading the summaries and by clicking the Listen Now links.

4. After you have 4-6 stories on your playlist, select the 2 or 3 best ones and delet the others.

5. Copy the links from each of the stories you've selected to the same Google Doc that you started above to collect links to iTunes podcasts.

  • Play each story, one-by-one.
  • Click Get link, then COPY LINK
  • Paste that link onto your Google Docs podcast page, and test the link.
  • Notice that most stories have transcripts that you can read when you listen to that story again.

6. Once you've copied into a Doc a couple of URL addresses to NPR stories about your inquiry question, and you've shared that document with your teacher and a few peers, listen to each of the podcasts straight through--without other distractions--and keep notes, first on paper, then online in a Dialectical Notes form.

  • Write down the time code (minutes:seconds) for where someone in the podcast says something significant so that you can transcribe this later. 
  • After you've listened to the entire podcast at least once, open up either a new Dialectical Notes form or one that you've already begun with other sources, and add transcriptions from the podcast on the left side and responses on the right side.
  • Be sure to add a citation for your podcast at the top of your form, and in the left column add the time code (minutes:seconds) for where we can find what you are transcribing on the video (instead of the page or paragraph number).
  • Share your Dialectical Notes with your teacher and a few peers, make this document Public and Publish to the web...