Gender roles

Mulan Archetype

Submitted by Turtle on Fri, 2015-05-29 12:32
Mulan
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The beloved disney character Mulan follows a hero archetype. She can be classified as a Hero as a Scapegoat. Mulan classifies this way because instead of letting her crippled father go off to war and probably die, she takes his place by pretending to be a man and going off to fight the evil Huns. She suffers for her dad which makes her a Hero as a Scapegoat. Although she is discovered and sent home she goes back to warn the army that the Huns actually survived and were going to kill the Emperor. She saves his life and is recognized as a hero by the nation, and also finds love in the process.

Mulan Archetype

Submitted by Turtle on Fri, 2015-05-29 12:32
Mulan
External video: 
See video

The beloved disney character Mulan follows a hero archetype. She can be classified as a Hero as a Scapegoat. Mulan classifies this way because instead of letting her crippled father go off to war and probably die, she takes his place by pretending to be a man and going off to fight the evil Huns. She suffers for her dad which makes her a Hero as a Scapegoat. Although she is discovered and sent home she goes back to warn the army that the Huns actually survived and were going to kill the Emperor. She saves his life and is recognized as a hero by the nation, and also finds love in the process.

Mulan Archetype

Submitted by Turtle on Fri, 2015-05-29 12:31
Mulan
External video: 
See video

The beloved disney character Mulan follows a hero archetype. She can be classified as a Hero as a Scapegoat. Mulan classifies this way because instead of letting her crippled father go off to war and probably die, she takes his place by pretending to be a man and going off to fight the evil Huns. She suffers for her dad which makes her a Hero as a Scapegoat. Although she is discovered and sent home she goes back to warn the army that the Huns actually survived and were going to kill the Emperor. She saves his life and is recognized as a hero by the nation, and also finds love in the process.

Caregivers to CEOs- The Evolution of Feminine Gender Roles in Society

Submitted by LookingForMegan on Mon, 2014-05-12 13:46

Girls wear pink; boys wear blue. Girls play dolls; boys play trucks. Girls are sweet; boys are tough. Things along this line might be what you’ve heard throughout history. Though we still have quite a ways to go, constricting gender roles have evolved greatly from the inhibiting, masculinist society of the middle ages, to the “perfect” families of the 1950’s, and through the social turmoil of the 60’s and 70’s into the modern day.

Boys in Tutus and Girls on Trucks: Why Gender Roles are Confusing, Limiting, And Frustrating

Submitted by LookingForMegan on Mon, 2014-04-21 14:09

Something that I’m interested in learning more about is gender roles in society. I’ve read and heard a bit about it over the years, and have been looking for a chance to study it more in-depth. Recently, I came across an amazing group called The Representation Project that provided a way for me to take action against things of this nature. When it came time to choose a topic to write an inquiry about, I was instantly reminded of this movement.

Correlation Between Stereotypes and Gender Roles of Ancient Society

Submitted by Gabrielle Regenhardt on Fri, 2012-02-24 16:54

As I have been studying the gender roles of women in classical societies, I have discovered that despite religious stories with prominent females found within many of the religions of each respective society, it had no correlation with the way women were treated. I was surprised to find that religious beliefs had no impact whatsoever on the roles that these ancient women had in their given culture.

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