Raise Your Voice: Activism and Responding to Texts

Missions
Jun 2, 2016
CC License: Attribution Share Alike by Keith Rowley, yugenro on flickr

"Experimental Group Voice singer," CC License: Attribution Share Alike by Keith Rowley, yugenro on flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/yugen/2966490322

Will you: 

Select an issue you care about. Select appropriate media. Draft and create your media content. Post and comment on Youth Voices.

You are invited to engage in a critical conversation related to your reading through media making.


Video Source: The KQED Art School: https://wp.me/p4AWsA-eJ Boldness, accessibility, visibility and reproducibility are just a few of the qualities that help make political art stand out and reach new audiences. This video presents five steps to create your own political art. Take these steps and blend them with the six below, and let your work shout a message from the rooftops!


Step One of Six: Read more and annotate different opinions about an issue you care about.

What have you been talking about in your classes at school or after school? Or choose an issue related to an upcoming local or national election.

1a. Read and annotate what two or three of the politicians each are saying about two or three of these 24 issues from:

Use these links to find the record of and quotations from two or three of the candidates in the current election. Annotate these records with hypothes.is, and follow links under the candidates' names to do more annotations of their quotations.
Abortion 
Budget & Economy 
Civil Rights 
Corporations 
Crime 
Drugs 
Education 
Energy & Oil 
Environment 
Families & Children 
Foreign Policy 
Free Trade
Government Reform 
Gun Control 
Health Care 
Homeland Security 
Immigration 
Infrastructure & Technology 
Jobs 
Principles & Values 
Social Security 
Tax Reform 
War & Peace 
Welfare & Poverty

1b. Use these topics from ProCon.org to explore a few issues that you care about, and to choose one that you want to make media about. Annotate the articles and arguements you find on the site with hypothes.is.



Topics A-Z


1c. Speak back on an issue or topic you really care about by annotating with hypothes.is. You will need an issue or topic that you really care about, something you can dig your teeth into. Still not sure where to start? Try browsing the New York Times Room for Debate series as one way to think through a range of topics and opinions.

(Control+click/Right Click on links in this box to annotate in a new window/tab.)


Step Two of Six: Determine what you have to say about the topic.

For instance, you might want to share a message with others that they matter (as an aspect of making people feel part of a community) or you might think about an election issue that matters to you and the role of sharing facts about this issue.

Use one of these Guides: Personal Inquiry | Five Reliable Sources | Speculating on an Inquiry.

See this handout, Lesson 11. Personal Inquiry Reflections [PDF] from Research Writing Rewired: Lessons that Ground Students’ Digital Learning by Dawn Reed and Troy Hicks.


Step Three of Six: Select an appropriate media to share your message.

You might consider creating an infographic or vine or meme. Select your media to compose the best way to communicate your message. Some options: meme, vine, TED talk, documentary, digital story, infographic, podcast or radio show, webinar (your own recorded conversation, like Youth Voices Live), advertisement, website, blog, or other ideas. Check out what other students are using in the left margin.


Brainstorm and Outline Media Work

  • Write out the MAPS plan for your media work.
  • Work on brainstorming, outlining, and drafting media work.

Remember to think about your rhetorical situation (MAPS):

  • Mode refers to what the writer understands about the type, or genre, of writing, including the conventions of writing that make up the modality.
  • Media refers to the tools with which we compose, such as a collaborative word processor, a video-editing program, or an online space. Each of these media forms has technical conventions that guide it but is not necessarily rhetorically focused in and of itself.
  • Audience refers to what previous experiences and knowledge of the intended reader the writer can assume, as well as recognition of what the audience may be interested in hearing.
  • Purpose refers to the action that this writing will take, such as to inform or argue; it involves the reasons the writer is composing this text.
  • Situation refers to the personal context for the writer (e.g., experience in the genre, comfort with the topic, preferences for writing) and the writing task (e.g., deadline, length, formatting requirements).

  • See this handout, Lesson 23. Media Work [PDF] from Research Writing Rewired: Lessons that Ground Students’ Digital Learning by Dawn Reed and Troy Hicks.

    Step Four of Six: Draft your content and get feedback.

    Get responses from peers and your teachers and mentors. Your media composition should address the issue, add on to the conversation, and engage your audience.

    When you share your ideas and drafts with your peers discuss the following moves as you share your ideas for crafting your media project:

    • What argument will this media project suggest?
    • What are the claims in the project?
    • What is the evidence?
    • What parts are clear? What parts could use further clarity?

    See this handout, Lesson 25. Workshop: Inquiry-Based
    Research Essay and Media Projects
    from Research Writing Rewired: Lessons that Ground Students’ Digital Learning by Dawn Reed and Troy Hicks.


    Step Five of Six: Revise, then publish your media, embedding it in a Youth Voices discussion post.

    Use the embed code provided for you by the platform that you are using to create the media. (Look around to find it.)

    This should include a written reflection, explaining your project including your personal goals for the media and how you met these goals for the composition.

    See this handout, Lesson 28. Reflecting, Sharing, and Celebrating the Final Media Project from Research Writing Rewired: Lessons that Ground Students’ Digital Learning by Dawn Reed and Troy Hicks.


    Step Six of Six: Comment on and Reply to other "Raised Voices" posts on Youth Voices.

    Use these guides: General Discussion Responese | Agree/Disagree Response | Quoting a Source in a Comment | 8 Intriguing Strategies to Continue the Discussion


    Work you will have: 

    1. Links to your ten best hypothes.is annotations for your response to what two or three politicians each are saying about two or three issues in a current electoral campaign.
    2. Links to 15 more hypothes.is annotataions on further research you did on an issue that you care about.
    3. A link to a post on Youth Voices where you say what you knew at the beginning of your research and what you wanted to know about your issue, using one of these guides: Personal Inquiry | Five Reliable Sources | Speculating on an Inquiry.
    4. A link to a post on Youth Voices with your embedded media about your issue. This should include a written reflection, explaining your project including your personal goals for the media and how you met these goals for the composition.
    5. Links to your comments on and replies to other "Raised Voices" posts on Youth Voices, using these guides: General Discussion Responese | Agree/Disagree Response | Quoting a Source in a Comment | 8 Intriguing Strategies to Continue the Discussion